Reuters does not understand that there is more than one University of Maryland

Reuters, a well-respected international wire service, hath made a boo-boo.

In an article published late Tuesday about the U.S News & World Report college rankings, the author makes repeated references to the “University of Maryland” being ranked the number one “up and coming” school, ranked 157th in the “national universities” category. Which sounds lovely, except that’s the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, which does not call itself the “University of Maryland.”

The original article text:

Ivy League schools again topped a popular ranking of the best U.S. colleges, but shared the spotlight with liberal arts schools Williams College and Amherst College, and “up-and-coming” University of Maryland.

Top “up-and-comer,” was Maryland, a public institution founded in 1963, with in-state-tuition and fees of $9,171 for 2011-2012, according to U.S. News. Maryland only ranks No. 157 among “Best Colleges.”

The university that goes by “the University of Maryland” is actually the 17th-best public university in the country, according to the relatively pointless rankings, and the 55th-best national university. It was also founded in 1856, not, like Reuters says, 1963.

UMBC was likewise not founded in 1963, but 1966, so who knows what this correction is going to look like — all that’s clear is that somebody glossed over the section of the Reuters journalism policy guide that says to “cross-check information wherever possible.”

You can also check out Campus Drive on Facebook and on Twitter at @theDBK.

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